[2] [3], The film was screened in Austin, Texas (USA) at the South by Southwest Film Festival in March 2009. The credits are inter-cut with prior footage, revealing several sightings of Alice's ghost throughout the film that had gone unnoticed. He also cited a curiosity as to how "technology is used to record people's lives and sort of tracks memories, and how technology mediates a lot of our experiences". Humans have been living around Lake Mungo for at least 50,000 years. Ray admits that Alice had met with him several months before her death and had told him she was having dreams about drowning, being dead and her mother not being able to see or help her. A stone axe head, at least 500 years old, was also found in the dunes; it was made from stone from Mount Camel, near Shepparton, well over 300 km away. It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Lake Mungo (film)". At first she was thought to be 25,000 years old. Mungo Lady, a partly cremated body, was discovered in 1969 by Dr Jim Bowler from the Australian National University (ANU). The Virtual Geomagnetic Pole (VGP) of one happened at the same time as Lake Mungo which suggests the event was global rather than local. Anderson was finding it difficult to acquire funding for another script he had written which required a much larger budget. Lake Mungo is a mystery, a thriller and a ghost story. It is also the site of the Lake Mungo geomagnetic excursion, the first convincing evidence that Geomagnetic excursions are a geomagnetic phenomenon rather than sedimentological.[3]. However, this erosion has led to the uncovering of many human and animal remains. Except where otherwise indicated, Everything.Explained.Today is © Copyright 2009-2020, A B Cryer, All Rights Reserved. Be aware that the movie is mock-umntary, so there is no jump scares and anything like that. Lake Mungo is one of 17 dried Pleistocene Epoch (about 2.6 million to 11,700 years go) lake beds in the Willandra Lakes region, which was designated a World Heritage site in 1981. When people first arrived in Australia, they found unique plants and animals. [13], Simon Foster of the Special Broadcasting Service declared Lake Mungo to be "one of the most impressive debut films from this country in many years" and further commented that "the young director has created a nerve-rattler unlike any film the Australian industry has produced. Ancient human footprint preserved in clay on the shore of dried-up Lake Mungo, Mungo National Park, New South Wales, Australia. The water disappeared with the end of the ice age and the lake has been dry for more than 10,000 years. Your email address will not be published. Murray River basin 100 km away. Carbon-14 dating indicated that these remains were approximately 40,000 years old, meaning that Mungo Lady and Mungo Man were the oldest human remains found in Australia to that date. Lake Mungo, which dried up about 14,000 years ago, became one of the world’s most important archaeological sites when geologist Jim Bowler unearthed the remains of a young Aboriginal woman in 1968. We call these extinct giant animals megafauna. Lake Mungo succeeds because there isn’t one stage where you question the family’s pain. Lake Mungo, which dried up about 14,000 years ago, became one of the world’s most important archaeological sites when geologist Jim Bowler unearthed the remains of a young Aboriginal woman in 1968. It supported a large human population, as well as many varieties of Australian megafauna. After the death, the family members started to see strange things are happening in their home. He also cited a curiosity as to how "technology is used to record people's lives and sort of tracks memories, and how technology mediates a lot of our experiences". Lake Mungo will have it's first Australian television screening on WEDNESDAY the 6th at 10PM on SBS ONE. The credits are inter-cut with prior footage, revealing several sightings of Alice's ghost throughout the film that had gone unnoticed. The bones of the skeleton, referred to as Mungo Lady, had been burnt before burial, making them the world’s oldest evidence of cremation and ceremonial burial. It is one of 17 lakes in the World Heritage listed Willandra Lakes Region. Data from lake sediments of a similar age in France having near identical magnetic field lines also support Lake Mungo being a global event. If someone were to cleverly incorporate this movie onto PBS' program schedule, there's a very strong possibility that some I actually teared … In 1972, Archaeomagnetic studies were carried out on the prehistoric aboriginal fireplaces found along the ancient shoreline of Lake Mungo. [13] Writing on Quickflix, Simon Miraudo evaluated the movie to be "a mournful, dreamlike examination of the hole left in the heart of a family after a death",[14] and awarded it ✦✦✦✦✦ (5 stars). Pay close attention to the Kids learning space pages above, then see how many answers you can get right! [18] Later that year, Meagan Navarro of Bloody Disgusting also recommended the film, writing that "The scares come subtle, often lurking in the background for only the most observant to notice", and calling the film a "unique horror movie, a slow-burn mystery full of twists and one seriously unnerving jump scare for the ages. [6] On 13 March 2009, the film was shown at the Travelling Film Festival in Wagga Wagga, Australia. Most of the movie is the interview with the family members. Sedimentsat Lake Mungo have been deposited over more than 100,000 years. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use Privacy Policy. The bones of the skeleton, referred to as Mungo Lady, had been burnt before burial, making them the world’s oldest evidence of cremation and ceremonial burial. Mungo Man had been buried and covered with red ochre. Up until that point, Lake Mungo seems like a pretty standard paranormal haunting film. Encyclopaedia Britannica's editors oversee subject areas in which they have extensive knowledge, whether from years of experience gained by working on that content or via study for an advanced degree.... Skeletal remains of Mungo Man, which are approximately 40,000 years old and were found in 1974 at Lake Mungo, New South Wales, Australia. Mungo Lady is the earliest known human to have been cremated. The Willandra region is home to the Barkindji, Nyiampaa and Mutthi Mutthi people.